So we assume you have read about our previous articles The Denim 101 and The Types of Fades, right? Thank you for keeping up with us until now. We will move from the basic stuff to a more advanced technique that can also be your reference to maximize the looks from your jeans, which is cuffing and stacking. The words cuff and stack are often heard in conversations among denim aficionados. That is why we will share further information about stack and cuff, the right way to do it, kinds of footwears that looks good with it, as well as the pros and cons.

First thing first, to be able to apply all the methods below, we really recommend you to keep the length of your jeans to be a bit longer than your legs, so when you wear the jeans it will cover your ankles. You can easily stack the jeans or apply a variety of cuff to get different looks from each cuffing technique with this length.

Stack

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Stack occurred when your jeans’ inseam is longer than your leg, so the leg opening stacks over your feet. It looks good with slimmer jeans and it can also produce fades. The tricky thing about stacking is how to arrange it, because wild stack makes the jeans look less tidy and less pleasing to the eye. Stack is good with hi-top sneakers and boots, because it helps the stacks to set neatly in place.

Cuff

Cuff is a fold on the leg opening as an attempt to get the length we desire without having to hem it. Cuffing is often done to manipulate the length of the jeans and also to show the selvedge line or the chainstitch on the leg opening, things that denim aficionados can be proud about. There are some variations to cuff, such as:

Single Cuff

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The most basic technique on cuffing and the easiest to do. You just have to fold the leg opening one time outward. The height of the cuff can be adjusted according to your personal taste: single small cuff will give a simple and clean look while a big single cuff produces a more vintage, high-water look.

Double Cuff

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Double cuff is an extension of the single cuff, where you fold the cuff once again to cover the first fold. The most striking difference between the single and double cuff is the appearance, because in double cuff the hemline is covered with the second fold. Another difference is the cuff will be thicker, especially if the jeans are made with heavy denim. You can still play with the height of the cuff to get several looks.

Pinroll

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This kind of cuff is deliberately done by rolling the leg opening outward so that the results is more like a roll, not a fold. It also make a loose cut jeans look a little tapered on the bottom part. Pinroll is suitable to get a relaxed impression and also suitable for the high-water look. The pinroll is good to combine with running shoes, boat shoes or any other low-top shoes.

Faux Single Cuff

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This method is widely used when your jeans are too long for single-cuff, but we still want the chainstitch to be seen from the outside. This method is a modification of the double cuff, only when we do the second fold, we put the tip of the first fold just below the hemline.

Another Faux Single Cuff

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Another modification for the faux single cuff. We do a single big cuff first, then instead of folding the lower part of the first cuff outward, we fold it inward only leaving the hemline. The look is pretty similar with the single cuff, suitable for you who can not get over your one favorite jeans yet still want to explore different looks by applying stack and also multiple cuffing methods.

So the next time you buy a brand new pair of jeans and you feel the jeans is too long for you, do not hem it straight away. Try all these methods first, combine it with your footwear collection, find the right one for you and voila: you can produce different look for every combination.

That is all for our series of denim related articles. If you can read through all the articles, we are very sure that you are interested enough for this whole denim culture. We won’t let your denim enthusiasm go to waste and strongly suggest you to come by to INDIGO – Indonesian Denim Group and Darahkubiru‘s annual event Wall of Fades 2017, which will be held this December. For more information, do not hesitate to swing by their Instagram Page.

When, Why and How to Properly Stack or Cuff Your Jeans
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